Chlamydia BacteriaChlamydia Bacteria. NIAIDChlamydia (kluh-MID-e-uh) trachomatis (truh-KOH-muh-tis) is a common sexually transmitted infection (STI) caused by bacteria. You might not know you have chlamydia because many people don't have signs or symptoms, such as genital pain and discharge from the vagina or penis.

Chlamydia trachomatis affects mostly young women, but it can occur in both men and women and in all age groups. It's not difficult to treat, but if left untreated it can lead to more-serious health problems. (Mayo Clinic)

 

Herpes Simplex Virus. Dr. Fred Murphy, Sylvia Whitfield, USCDCPGenital herpes is a common sexually transmitted infection caused by the herpes simplex virus (HSV). Sexual contact is the primary way that the virus spreads. After the initial infection, the virus lies dormant in your body and can reactivate several times a year. Genital herpes can cause pain, itching and sores in your genital area. But you may have no signs or symptoms of genital herpes. If infected, you can be contagious even if you have no visible sores. There's no cure for genital herpes (Mayo Clinic)

 

Genital warts are one of the most common types of sexually transmitted infections. Nearly all sexually active people will become infected with at least one type of human papillomavirus (HPV), the virus that causes genital warts, at some point during their lives.

Genital warts affect the moist tissues of the genital area. They can look like small, flesh-colored bumps or have a cauliflower-like appearance. In many cases, the warts are too small to be visible. (Mayo Clinic)

 

Gonorrhea Bacteria. USCDCP on PixnoGonorrhea is an infection caused by a sexually transmitted bacterium that infects both males and females. Gonorrhea most often affects the urethra, rectum or throat. In females, gonorrhea can also infect the cervix.

Gonorrhea is most commonly spread during vaginal, oral or anal sex. But babies of infected mothers can be infected during childbirth. In babies, gonorrhea most commonly affects the eyes. (Mayo Clinic)

 

Hepatitis B. Graham Beards Hepatitis B is a serious liver infection caused by the hepatitis B virus (HBV). For some people, hepatitis B infection becomes chronic, meaning it lasts more than six months. Having chronic hepatitis B increases your risk of developing liver failure, liver cancer or cirrhosis — a condition that permanently scars of the liver.

Sexual contact. You may get hepatitis B if you have unprotected sex with someone who is infected. The virus can pass to you if the person's blood, saliva, semen or vaginal secretions enter your body. (Mayo Clinic)

 

Syphillis Bacteria. NIAIDSyphilis is a bacterial infection usually spread by sexual contact. The disease starts as a painless sore — typically on your genitals, rectum or mouth. Syphilis spreads from person to person via skin or mucous membrane contact with these sores.

After the initial infection, the syphilis bacteria can remain inactive (dormant) in your body for decades before becoming active again. Early syphilis can be cured, sometimes with a single shot (injection) of penicillin. Without treatment, syphilis can severely damage your heart, brain or other organs, and can be life-threatening. Syphilis can also be passed from mothers to unborn children. (Mayo Clinic)

 

Trichomoniasis is a common sexually transmitted infection caused by a parasite. In women, trichomoniasis can cause a foul-smelling vaginal discharge, genital itching and painful urination.

Men who have trichomoniasis typically have no symptoms. Pregnant women who have trichomoniasis might be at higher risk of delivering their babies prematurely.

To prevent reinfection with the organism that causes trichomoniasis, both partners should be treated. (Mayo Clinic)

 

Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), which causes AIDS.


Did you know??

General symptoms for a baby born with herpes (contracted through a vaginal delivery) may include ulcers on the face, body, and genitals. Babies who are born with genital herpes can develop very severe complications and experience blindness, brain damage, death

It is very important that you tell your doctor if you contract genital herpes and are pregnant.

They will take precautions to prevent the virus from being transmitted to your baby during delivery, with one likely method being that your baby would be delivered via cesarean rather than a routine vaginal delivery.